Asia

How to Help the Stray Dogs of Bali

Help the stray dogs of Bali

This post was created in conjunction with Bali Villas.

With extensive experience in servicing Australian clients, Bali Villas know exactly what families are looking for in terms of location, style and pricing. Each of their family friendly villas situated on the beautiful island of Bali have been hand-picked by their ‘family expert’ – someone with children who knows exactly what families are looking for.

Contact Bali Villas for a short consultation, and they will be able to find you the perfect villa. Bali Villas aim to take the stress out of planning your holiday, so you can concentrate on creating lasting memories with your family.

As countless visitors have discovered, Bali is a wonderful destination to visit, whether for a short break with your family or if you’re dreaming of working as a digital nomad. (The many gorgeous but affordable villas on the island help!) But it’s definitely not somewhere you should take your dog. The Indonesian government currently bans the movement of dogs in or out of Bali, due to the presence of rabies. While I have read of ways to get around this if you’re determined to rescue a dog, don’t even consider about trying to sneak in a dog. Instead, consider lending a hand to one of the many organisations that help the stray dogs of Bali during your visit.

A List of Animal Organisations in Bali

If you’ve visited Bali already, it’s hard to not notice the many stray dogs and cats roaming the streets, many not in the best condition. Luckily, there’s a number of animal organisations that exist in Bali that help look after these dogs and cats, whether on the street or at animal shelters, ideally looking to re-home the needy animals, or at least provide them with medical assistance and rehabilitation. Each organisation helps in different ways.

Probably the most prominent organisation is Bali Animal Welfare Organisation (or BAWA). A not-for-profit organisation started in 2007, it provides everything from Bali’s only free animal ambulance to rehabilitation and adoption to street feeding to campaigning for responsible tourism.

Other animal rescue organisations helping the dogs and cats of Bali include:

Volunteering at an Organisation

Most of these animal rescue organisations are eager for volunteers. Your first thought when it comes to volunteering as part of your trip to Bali, is probably volunteering to help animals hand-on, including feeding, bathing, walking and cuddling. However, it’s best to carefully consider this option.

BAWA only allows volunteers to work with animals if they have received a rabies vaccination. If you check travel medical advisories, this vaccine (and potentially others) are recommended if you are to have close contact with animals in Indonesia. Even if other organisations don’t require you to have this vaccine, I would strongly recommend you only volunteer with animals if you have the vaccine for this deadly disease.

You should also keep in mind that many of the animals are in a bad state, and it can be heartbreaking to work with them. Check out more information provided by BAWA about volunteering hands-on with animals. Or read about the experience of one volunteer at BARC.

However, there are many other opportunities to volunteer, which many of the organisations would prefer to receive help with, particularly if you’re only staying in Bali short-term. Some of the organisations run shops and require volunteers to work in the shops. Alternatively, you may have valuable professional skills that could be required, such as graphic design, social media, IT development or photography. Finally, volunteers are usually required to help with fundraising projects.

Shopping at a Charity Shop

As I mentioned above, some of the animal rescue organisations run shops, mainly to assist with raising funds for the rest of their work. If you’re not staying in Bali for long, it’s worthwhile visiting these shops, mainly located in popular Ubud, and buying products to take home. Products range for specially branded souvenir products, to products for your dog back at home, to donated second-hand goods. Check out:

Alternatively, check out the gorgeous handmade goods at Bali Paws. The company supports Mission Pawsible from all sales. Products can be purchased online, or there are multiple stockists scattered around Bali.

Taking Goods to Bali

If you’ve got space in your suitcase when flying to Bali (especially if you’re leaving room for shopping during your stay!), consider taking goods to be donated to one of the animal charities in Bali. They generally have a long wish list at any time, ranging from medication to food to leashes to blankets for bedding.

Before you go, email one of the organisations and check what is most urgently needed and what you can best assist with. If you’re flying from Australia, sometimes there are donated goods stored in Australia that simply require to be transported to Bali.

Check out the wish lists for:

Fostering a Dog

If you’re staying longer term on Bali (at least a couple of weeks), you could consider fostering a dog or a cat. There’s always limited room to look after animals waiting to be adopted on premise, and often a foster home is ideal for newly immunised animals and young puppies and kittens.

Naturally, you will require permission from your landlord and to have a secure house and yard. Plus the minimum period is usually around 2 weeks. Contact one of these organisations to find out more:

It’s best to not rescue dogs directly off the streets, as they may in fact have an owner. If you do find a dog in need on the street, there are a number of online forums where you can check if they have a owner, such as Bali Community.

Making a Donation

Finally, all of these organisations would love to receive donations off you, whether you are currently in Bali or anywhere else in the world. Check out the websites for how to make a donation.

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